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BookAndGlasses
I had the privilege of being asked to present on ordering, RCU, and validation at a joint meeting of the REORDER (Third International Workshop on Memory Consistency Models) and EC2 (7th International Workshop on Exploiting Concurrency Efficiently and Correctly) workshops.

Before my talk, Michael Tautschnig gave a presentation (based on this paper) on an interesting prototype tool (called “mole,” with the name chosen because the gestation period of a mole is about 42 days) that helps identify patterns of usage in large code bases. It is early days for this tool, but one could imagine it growing into something quite useful, perhaps answering questions such as “what are the different ways in which the Linux kernel uses reference counting?” He also took care to call out the many disadvantages of testing, which include not being able to test all paths, all possible races, all possible inputs, or all possible much of anything, at least not in finite time.

I started my talk with an overview of split counters, where each CPU (or task or whatever) updates its own counter, and the aggregate counter is read out by summing all the per-CPU counters. There was some concern expressed by members of the audience about the possibility of inconsistent results. For example, if one CPU adds five, another CPU adds seven, and a third CPU adds 11 to initially zero counter, then two CPUs reading out the counter might see 12 and 18, respectively, which are inconsistent (they differ by six, and no CPU added six). To their credit, the attendees picked right up on a reasonable correctness criterion. The idea is that the aggregate counter's value varies with time, and that any given reader will be guaranteed to return a value between that of the counter when the reader started and that of the counter when the reader ended: Consistency is neither needed nor provided in a great number of situations.

I then gave my usual introduction to RCU, and of course it is always quite a bit of fun introducing RCU to people who have never encountered anything like it. There was quite a bit of skepticism initially, as well as a lot of questions and comments.

I then turned to validation, noting the promise of some formal-validation tooling. I ended by saying that although I agreed with the limitations of testing called out by the previous speaker, the fact remains that a number of people have devised tests that had found RCU bugs (thank you, Stephen, Dave, and Fengguang!), but no one has yet devised a hard-core formal-validation tool that has found any bugs in RCU. I also pointed out that this is definitely not because there are no bugs in RCU! (Yes, I have gotten rid of all day-one bugs in RCU, but only by having also gotten rid of all day-one code in RCU.) When asked if I meant bugs in RCU usage or in RCU itself, I replied “Either would be good.” Several people wrote down where to find RCU in the Linux kernel, so it will be interesting to see what they come up with. (Perhaps all too interesting!)

There were several talks on analyzing weakly ordered systems, but keep in mind that for these guys, even x86 is weakly ordered. After all, it allows prior stores to be reordered with later loads.

Another interesting talk was given by Kapil Vaswani on the topic of wait freedom. Recall that in a wait-free algorithm, every process is guaranteed to make some progress in a finite time, even in the presence of arbitrarily long delays for any given process. In contrast, in a lock-free algorithm, only one process is guaranteed to make some progress in a finite time, again, even in the presence of arbitrarily long delays for any given process. It is worth noting that neither of these guarantees is sufficient for real-time programs, which require a specified amount of progress (not merely some progress) in a bounded amount of time (not merely a finite amount of time). Wait-freedom and lock-freedom are nevertheless important forward-progress guarantees, and there are numerous other similar guarantees including obstruction freedom, deadlock freedom, starvation freedom, many more besides.

It turns out that most software in production, even in real-time systems, is not wait-free, which has been a source of consternation for many researchers for quite some time. Kapil went on to describe how Alistarh et al. showed that, roughly speaking, given a non-hostile scheduler and crash-free execution, lock-free algorithms have wait-free behavior.

The interesting thing about this is that you can take it quite a bit farther, and those of you who know me well won't be surprised to learn that I did just that in a question to the speaker. If you have a non-hostile scheduler, crash-free execution, FIFO locks, bounded lock-hold times, no lock nesting, a finite number of processes, and so on, you can obtain the benefits of the more aggressive forward-progress guarantees. The general idea is that if you have at most N processes, and if the maximum lock-hold time is T, then you can wait at most (N-1)T time to acquire a given lock. (Those wishing greater rigor should read Bjoern B. Brandenburg's dissertation — Full disclosure: I was on Bjoern's committee.) In happy contrast to the authors of the paper mentioned in the previous paragraph, the speaker and audience seemed quite intrigued by this line of thought.

In all, it was an extremely interesting and thought-provoking time. With some luck, perhaps we will see some powerful software tools introduced by this group of researchers.

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