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Some time ago, I figured out that there are more than a billion instances of the Linux kernel in use, and this in turn led to the realization that a million-year RCU bug is happening about three times a day across the installed base. This realization has caused me to focus more heavily on RCU validation, which has uncovered a number of interesting bugs. I have also dabbled a bit in formal verification, which has not yet found a bug. However, formal verification might be getting there, and might some day be a useful addition to RCU's regression testing. I was therefore quite happy to be invited to this Dagstuhl Seminar. In what follows, I summarize a few of the presentation. See here for the rest of the presentations.

Viktor Vafeiadis presented his analysis of the C11 memory model, including some “interesting” consequences of data races, where a data race is defined as a situation involving multiple concurrent accesses to a non-atomic variable, at least one of which is a write. One such consequence involves a theoretically desirable “strengthening” property. For example, this property would mean that multiplexing two threads onto a single underlying thread would not introduce new behaviors. However, with C11, the undefined-behavior consequences of data races can actually cause new behaviors to appear with fewer threads, for example, see Slide 7. This suggests the option of doing away with the undefined behavior, which is exactly the option that LLVM has taken. However, this approach requires some care, as can be seen on Slide 19. Nevertheless, this approach seems promising. One important takeaway from this talk is that if you are worried about weak ordering, you need to pay careful attention to reining in the compiler's optimizations. If you are unconvinced, take a look at this! Jean Pichon-Pharabod, Kyndylan Nienhuis, and Mike Dodds presented on other aspects of the C11 memory model.

Martin T. Vechev apparently felt that the C11 memory model was too tame, and therefore focused on event-driven applications, specifically javascript running on Android. This presentation included some entertaining concurrency bugs and their effects on the browser's display. Martin also discussed formalizing javascript's memory model.

Hongjin Liang showed that ticket locks can provide starvation freedom given a minimally fair scheduler. This provides a proof point for Björn B. Brandenburg's dissertation, which analyzed the larger question of real-time response from lock-based code. It should also provide a helpful corrective to people who still believe that non-blocking synchronization is required.

Joseph Tassarotti presented a formal proof of the quiescent-state based reclamation (QSBR) variant of userspace RCU. In contrast to previous proofs, this proof did not rely on sequential consistency, but instead leveraged a release-acquire memory model. It is of course good to see researchers focusing their tools on RCU! That said, when a researcher asked me privately whether I felt that the proof incorporated realistic assumptions, I of course could not resist saying that since they didn't find any bugs, the assumptions clearly must have been unrealistic.

My first presentation covered what would be needed for me to be able to use formal verification as part of Linux-kernel RCU's regression testing. As shown on slide 34, these are:


  1. Either automatic translation or no translation required. After all, if I attempt to manually translate Linux-kernel RCU to some special-purpose language every release, human error will make its presence known.
  2. Correctly handle environment, including the memory model, which in turn includes compiler optimizations.
  3. Reasonable CPU and memory overhead. If these overheads are excessive, RCU is better served by simple stress testing.
  4. Map to source code lines containing the bug. After all, I already know that there are bugs—I need to know where they are.
  5. Modest input outside of source code under test. The sad fact is that a full specification of RCU would be at least as large as the implementation, and also at least as buggy.
  6. Find relevant bugs. To see why this is important, imagine that some tool finds 100 different million-year bugs and I fix them all. Because roughly one of six fixes introduces a bug, and because that bug is likely to reproduce in far less than a million years, this process has likely greatly reduced the robustness of the Linux kernel.


I was not surprised to get some “frank and honest” feedback, but I was quite surprised (but not at all displeased) to learn that some of the feedback was of the form “we want to see more C code.” After some discussion, I provided just that.

Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
nikitadanilov
May. 20th, 2015 10:42 pm (UTC)
s/implemneted/implemented/ on p.1 of "Some Examples...". :-)
paulmck
May. 21st, 2015 12:42 am (UTC)
Good catch, thank you!
Fixed locally, will post an update at some point.
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )